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A few qeusitons about russia
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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Way to Russia Talk Lounge Forum Index -> Russian Contexts, Myths and Truths
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baumjoe
Just Starting


Joined: 09 Jul 2007
Posts: 2
Location: USA california

PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2007 1:46 pm    Post subject: A few qeusitons about russia Reply with quote

So ever since the book trilogy night watch, day watch, and dusk watch came to the states I have been really interested in learning more about its culture and hopefully being able to come visit Russia at some point.

So one of the questions I have is what is traditionally had with Russian vodka?

Also do you recommend learning to speak a decent amount of Russian before going? or can I get by with out it?

Ok this question is for people who's first language is not Russian. Do you think it was harder to learn than say other languages like Spanish?

And what would be the best way to go about learning it.

thanks in advance.
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Generation-P
WayToRussified


Joined: 22 May 2006
Posts: 316
Location: SHE WENT TO BARCELONA!

PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2007 2:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Have you checked the food section already? There are some good appetizers to go with vodka Smile

http://www.waytorussia.net/WhatIsRussia/RussianFood/Appetizers.html

Learning decent amount of Russian is what I'd recommend. You'll get much more from your trip if you learn the alphabet. If you have time you should also try to learn handwriting, not just capital letters. Ni pukha, ni pera!
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jo-jo-7
Just Starting


Joined: 16 Mar 2010
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2007 3:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Generation P wrote:
Have you checked the food section already? There are some good appetizers to go with vodka Smile

http://www.waytorussia.net/WhatIsRussia/RussianFood/Appetizers.html

Learning decent amount of Russian is what I'd recommend. You'll get much more from your trip if you learn the alphabet. If you have time you should also try to learn handwriting, not just capital letters. Ni pukha, ni pera!


I could do most of it except the tongue and the herring, which is probably the most popular among the Russians.

I eat pickles all the time. Love them. I could do that with the Russians.

Got a question, does the women drink with the men too or do they drink with other Russian women only? If you are invited over to someones home for dinner, would it be an insult not to eat something I didn't like that was served, such as the herring?
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gomer
WayToRussified


Joined: 30 Mar 2007
Posts: 445

PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2007 3:41 pm    Post subject: Re: A few qeusitons about russia Reply with quote

baumjoe wrote:
Also do you recommend learning to speak a decent amount of Russian before going? or can I get by with out it?


Yes and yes. The trip will be more enjoyable if you learn some Russian but you can survive with a good dictionary or phrasebook.
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karnot
Frequent Guest


Joined: 22 Dec 2006
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2007 5:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

These days you can probably find some english speaker on the streets rather easily, if you REALLY need something.
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Daria
Lounge Wizard


Joined: 16 May 2005
Posts: 1146
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2007 6:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

karnot wrote:
These days you can probably find some english speaker on the streets rather easily, if you REALLY need something.


The last time I was in Moscow, I got lost in Metro. I was standing there, soooo lost and confused, I didn't know where to go or what to do....And I'm Russian russian. I was born in Russia. Anyway, so I'm standing there, the next thing is there is an old old man in front of me, asking me IN ENGLISH!!!! " Do you speak Endlish?? Are you lost ??" I answered in ENGLISH, " Yes I speak English, I'm looking for a station so and so.."
The old man pushed me towards the train, then to the cross walk, next train, stairs, train, walk...etc. It took a second for him to get me where I needed to go. While "walking" me, the old man was reading Russian poems in English. I recognized Pushkin and others.... Rolling Eyes Gosh. So, as soon as we reached my station, he looked at me and said, " Here you are, this is your station, exit is there Arrow FIVE HUNDRED RUBLES PLEASE!!!. Hey, dedyshka, spasibo ( thanks), hear is a "hundred", nice work. Rolling Eyes
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Generation-P
WayToRussified


Joined: 22 May 2006
Posts: 316
Location: SHE WENT TO BARCELONA!

PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 1:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jo jo 7 wrote:

I could do most of it except the tongue and the herring, which is probably the most popular among the Russians.

I eat pickles all the time. Love them. I could do that with the Russians.

Got a question, does the women drink with the men too or do they drink with other Russian women only? If you are invited over to someones home for dinner, would it be an insult not to eat something I didn't like that was served, such as the herring?


Vodka is usually mostly consumed by men. Women usually drink wine, red, white or sparkling. I don't think that it would be heavy insult if you wouldn't eat something. Here the age of your host might be a big role, what elder your host is, the more sad she gets if you don't eat everything possible till you burst. Russians usually show their feeling and emotions very open, don't argue heavily with them, it'll go by. I still remember when after eating ONLY two full bowls of borshch, I got complaints about not eating enough and very upset whispers "nu tebe nadoelo"... Embarassed
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surfguy
Lounge Wizard


Joined: 13 Apr 2006
Posts: 6979

PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 1:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

all the women I was with all drank cognac...lots of it...and whiskey with tea
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Generation-P
WayToRussified


Joined: 22 May 2006
Posts: 316
Location: SHE WENT TO BARCELONA!

PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 3:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

yeps, surfguy, those drinks are to... drink!! Very Happy Also whiskey or rum with tea are good. I know one Russian girl who is so obsessed with Martini, but they are both good company, so I have no reason to complain Smile
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nikir
Frequent Guest


Joined: 17 Mar 2010
Posts: 56

PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 4:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jo jo 7 wrote:

I could do most of it except the tongue and the herring, which is probably the most popular among the Russians.


Tongue is a delicacy, and in my family it is unthinkable to drink vodka without herring. Salted herring with onion, egg, mayonnaise and black bread.
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jo-jo-7
Just Starting


Joined: 16 Mar 2010
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 5:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

nikir wrote:
jo jo 7 wrote:

I could do most of it except the tongue and the herring, which is probably the most popular among the Russians.


Tongue is a delicacy, and in my family it is unthinkable to drink vodka without herring. Salted herring with onion, egg, mayonnaise and black bread.


What does herring taste like? Is it similar to salmon? I am afraid that I might insult someone if I don't eat all my food. I am not a big eater.

A friend of mine in NY invited me to their home for Christmas because I could not leave my demanding job for one day and they are 100% Italian. I have never seen so much food. Her father put 5 big tiger shrimp (the size of my hand) on my plate and he sat next to me watching me eat them. I only ate 2 because I knew I wouldn't be able to eat dinner if I ate the rest, well he looked at me with this evil eye and I got a little scared so I finished my shrimp, he said GOOD, and he put more on my plate.. Shocked . I have never ever ate that much food in my LIFE! I had to force my dinner down my throat, chasing it with wine. Afterwards, I got so tired from all the food that I fell asleep in one of their chairs in the living room. Embarassed Besides everything, I had a great time.
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surfguy
Lounge Wizard


Joined: 13 Apr 2006
Posts: 6979

PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 5:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Generation P wrote:
yeps, surfguy, those drinks are to... drink!! Very Happy Also whiskey or rum with tea are good. I know one Russian girl who is so obsessed with Martini, but they are both good company, so I have no reason to complain Smile


I like Martinis...and most Vodka drinks...I tell you the russian girls could drink...but as I mentioned before...the Tequila put everyone down for the count...they weren't used to that...and the other Russian guy...he was so tore up...totally funny!
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Generation-P
WayToRussified


Joined: 22 May 2006
Posts: 316
Location: SHE WENT TO BARCELONA!

PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 4:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, Jo Jo, it is not that serious. Russians may complain out loud, and then forget it. No worries Smile but remember to make compliments about the food! If you're among young people you don't have to eat that much, young Russian girls live on salad. (Young men survive with beer, sukhariki and dried fish)
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jo-jo-7
Just Starting


Joined: 16 Mar 2010
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2007 2:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a new question, today I met a guy from Kiev (Sasha ). What is the difference in Ukrainian and Russian language, they are the same, correct? He told me he was from the Ukraine and spoke Russian but it seemed different. When my friend speaks Russian to her mother it has a slight difference in sound compared with this guy I spoke with.

I know this is crazy but I am curious, maybe it was just my imagination... Think
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vox16
Just Starting


Joined: 14 Apr 2010
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2007 2:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jo jo 7 wrote:
I have a new question, today I met a guy from Kiev (Sasha ). What is the difference in Ukrainian and Russian language, they are the same, correct? He told me he was from the Ukraine and spoke Russian but it seemed different. When my friend speaks Russian to her mother it has a slight difference in sound compared with this guy I spoke with.


No they are not the same because they are different. If he speaks Russian it can be percepted differently due to regional accent or even because of individual traits of voice. Well... unless you have a strong ground to suspect that guy intentionally spoke Ukrainian to you.
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